Regardless of how you choose to celebrate this Halloween, here are a few ways to make safety a part of your planning.

Here at Safe Kids, we often hear from parents who have faced the heartbreaking loss of a child. You will want to read this story by Gordon and Julie Ross, loving parents who are eager to share their story so other parents can learn from their tragedy.

-Torine Creppy, Chief Program Officer for the United States

Co-authored by Kate Carr, former President and CEO, Safe Kids Worldwide.

This week, Safe Kids Worldwide weighed in on an important issue concerning children. And we brought 62 of our closest friends with us.

As a certified child passenger technician and instructor, working in injury prevention, I frequently hear this question. Not surprising, given tight household budgets and the constantly increasing costs of raising children.

First, let’s look at the things that rule out using secondhand seats, then we can better determine when it’s okay.

Our hearts go out to the millions of families who were affected by Hurricane Sandy. We are so grateful to emergency personnel who are working around the clock to make things better.

If there is one thing this “storm of the century” has taught us, it’s the importance of planning ahead and being safe.

Our partners at the U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) are dedicated to educating children and families about fire safety. Now that it’s National Fire Prevention Week, USFA Fire Program Specialist Teresa Neal wanted to share a few messages and one very important challenge.

Thursday was Safe Kids Day on Capitol Hill. We held a bipartisan event on September 20 to educate Senators, Members of Congress and their staff about the risks that kids face and the challenges parents have in preventing unintentional injury, the #1 killer of kids in America.

Suspense may be important in a movie, but not when you are buying products for your young children. A high chair, crib or even a swing set for the back yard can be among the most important investments in your career as a parent. But there's a way to take the suspense out of shopping.

My job is a pretty good one. When I’m asked what I do at Safe Kids, I usually distill my answer to three things: make sure kids have fun, stay active and are free from injury. Not a bad 9-5, right? Practically speaking, much of my time is spent on the third item, keeping kids safe while at play.

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