The weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day are arguably the busiest of the year. Families are planning trips to visit relatives, searching for thoughtful gifts, preparing special meals and many other tasks to make the holidays the most wonderful time of the year.

While recognizing that driving a car is very serious business, officials hope that these signs will be more than one-time reminders to drivers. In addition to making people laugh, they hope these attention-grabbing signs will be family conversation starters, and help create more long-term safe driving habits.

My hope is that this PSA inspires parents, kids, caretakers and anyone else who watches it to do the little things that can make a big difference. Something as simple as buckling a car seat or checking the batteries in a smoke alarm can change the news and make a world of difference for parents, families and communities around the world. 

 I hope my story encourages parents to always buckle up their kids regardless of the situation. You don’t want to feel the pain or grief I am going through. The sadness is overwhelming, even after a year. 

So no more guessing about recalls. We all have other things to worry about. No fuss, no muss. Complete and mail the registration card – it’s a small, but important step in making sure your child is riding as safely as possible.   

Following the largest car seat recall in U.S. history last year, Safe Kids wants you to know how to protect your child.

For too long, global road safety has not received the priority it deserves, especially when it comes to the needs of children. Not only are children at high risk in vehicles, on bicycles, and in some countries on motorcycles, they are vulnerable as pedestrians and are often injured or killed in the simple act of walking to school.

Every day around the world, more than 500 children lose their lives in traffic crashes. Tens of thousands are injured, sometimes suffering lifelong disabilities. Not only are children at high risk in vehicles, on bicycles, and on motorcycles, they are vulnerable as pedestrians and are often injured or killed in the simple act of walking to school.

Our new study helps answer some of the questions parents have about when to switch from a booster seat to just a seat belt. We surveyed 1,000 parents of children ages 4 to 10 and found that an alarming number of parents are allowing kids to use a seat belt alone before they are big enough. In fact, 7 in 10 parents do not know that a child should be at least 57 inches (4’9”) to ride in a car without a booster seat.

I’m a state trooper, a certified child passenger safety technician and a father of four kids under the age of 11, so I understand the importance of safety seats. I’ll never forget the day in March 2014, when I saw for myself just how important they are. I was volunteering at a car seat inspection at the Fabius-Park Township fire department, just outside of Three Rivers, Mich. The forecast that day was for rain and snow. Ice had already started covering the roads.

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